Search Results

Certification

10DLC Registration

In preparation for AT&T’s launch of their A2P (Application-to-Person) 10DLC service, we want to provide you with five steps you can take now to prepare for the rollout. We are anticipating an official launch of AT&T 10DLC in first-quarter 2021 and will require registration completion well in advance of that. We will continue to provide details of their full commercial launch as we receive additional updates. This change will affect the way you use 10-digit long codes to facilitate SMS communications. Note that toll-free numbers are not governed under this launch, only U.S. standard 10-digit long codes.

iconectiv®’s TruReach Deliver Aerialink is here to facilitate this transition for you. In the coming weeks, we will be registering your brands and campaigns for 10DLC. We are currently working on the forms and backend processes to gather your registration information and will let you know as soon as these are available.

A2P 10DLC is a sanctioned service that has rules, restrictions and carrier-specific codes of conduct which is included in our Acceptable Use Policy. Before beginning the registration process detailed on this page please read the A2P Regulations & Conduct.

Step 1: Gather Brand Information

A brand is a business or individual behind the campaign and the entity responsible for the messaging content in a campaign. As your Campaign Service Provider, TruReach Deliver Aerialink submits your brand and campaign details to the 10DLC Registry. The Registry will perform verifications of every brand registered.

Here is a short list of typical brand information required.

  • Company’s legal name
  • Brand URLs
  • Contact information
  • Tax ID/ Employee ID Number (EIN)

For detailed information, see the Brand Registration section of the A2P 10DLC Brand and Campaign Registration Information document.

Step 2: Assess Use Cases

How are you using long codes for messaging currently? Categorize your message content based on the use cases outlined in the campaign registration section of the A2P 10DLC Brand and Campaign Registration Information document. Here is a preview of some of the information required to register each campaign:

  • Use case
  • Campaign description
  • Sample message
  • Weblinks in your message content
  • Opt-in and opt-out information
  • 10-digit number for message delivery

Some special campaign use-cases require the brand to be vetted by a participating vetting provider.

Step 3: Choose Long Codes

Note: a single number cannot be associated with more than one campaign.
There is a new carrier expectation that standard campaigns will utilize only one long code for sending and receiving messages. However, there can be exceptions. For instance, a company with multiple locations, each with a different text-enabled number sharing the same customer care use case could potentially qualify for an exception. We can request that the carrier reviews the special use case.

AT&T will assign your campaign’s allotted throughput based on the use case. AT&T is finalizing their throughput limits. Once these have been confirmed, we will share the details.

Step 4: Submit for Registration

As mentioned, we will provide a form where you can enter the necessary brand and campaign information. Once submitted, we will register your brand and campaign(s) on your behalf. When successfully registered, each campaign will be assigned a campaign ID, which is used to tag all long codes in that campaign.

Please be sure to stay aware of any and all associated fees prior to registering.

AT&T 10DLC Message Class

The message class is the means by which AT&T designates trust levels for brands based on their use-cases and content.

Note that less trusted senders will be subjected to more rigorous anti-SPAM policies than those with a higher level of trust. Changes to message class can be requested.

U.S. Short Code Certification

For a short code to be certified, all required campaign components must meet carrier expectations. Remember: being legally compliant to the TCPA does not satify carrier requirements. Carriers can and will refuse to certify campaigns which uphold TCPA but do not meet their individual requirements.

Short Code Self-Check

Carriers conduct routine audits on all components of a live short-code program to ensure ongoing compliance, but this begins during the program certification process, so it is important to not only get off to a good start but sustain compliance at all times.

Ask yourself the following questions when reviewing your mobile program. If you answer “no” to any of them, your campaign is at risk of noncompliance.

  • Do all of your CTAs display opt-in instructions, a brief description of service, the word “recurring” if applicable, a message and data disclaimer and links to both Privacy Policy and mobile program Terms & Conditions clearly and conspicuously?
  • Is the “who, what, when, where, how” about your campaign obvious in your CTA?
  • Are all of your mobile programs clearly identified?
  • Have all of your mobile end-users provided express consent as defined by both the CTIA and the FCC TCPA?
  • Does your users’ consent apply solely to the program(s) for which they have expressly opted in?
  • Are your HELP and STOP keywords functioning properly, regardless of whether the end-user is opted into the program?
  • Do you present HELP and STOP information at point of opt-in?
  • Do you fulfill all opt-out requests within 72 hours of the end-user texting “STOP”?

Short Code CTA

A Call-to-Action both describes a mobile program and provides opt-in instructions to potential users. Remember: the carriers’ goal is to promote a consistent end-user experience across all short-code programs, so although some compliance language may differ depending on the type of media the CTA is published in, certain aspects remain expected across all mediums:

  • Company name
  • Program name
  • Description of offer
  • Terms & Conditions’ location
  • Privacy Policy location
  • Customer support information*
  • Opt-in Instructions
  • Opt-out Instructions (if recurring)*
  • Message & data rates disclaimer
  • “Recurring” statement (if recurring)

*Opt-out instructions and customer support information may be left out of the CTA if they are described within the Terms & Conditions and the Terms are properly linked from the CTA.

The “Why” About CTA Requirements

What the CTA provides is an answer to five “Ws” - who, what, when, where, how - to do with your mobile program. Below, we answer your “why” with in-depth explanations of which questions each compliance component answers.

QuestionComponentReason
WhoCompany NameAny mention of the sponsor company name in the CTA must be consistent. If the CTA mentions “ABC University” in one sentence and “ABCU” in another, this a conflict in company name consistency which will be flagged by the carriers for its potential to cause end-user confusion. Ensure that your sponsor name remains consistent throughout your CTA, even if it seems repetitive.
WhatProgram Name
Program Description
Just as with the company name, the name by which you refer to your program must be consistent throughout your Call to Action. Furthermore, the words describing what your service provides must be clear and conspicuous without hidden meaning.
WhereT&Cs Location
Privacy Policy Location
Users should be provided instructions for accessing your mobile program T&Cs and company privacy policy within your CTA, to answer any questions they may have about opting into your program that aren’t answered in the CTA itself.
WhenDuration
Frequency/Recurrence
Is your program on-going indefinitely or is it a one-month-long promotion? These questions must be answered in your CTA. Furthermore, while outright message frequencies expressing a detailed number of messages per time period are no longer required, programs that are subscription-based - or “recurring” - must state that fact within their CTA.
HowOpt-in Instructions
Message&Data Disclaimer
“Text PROMO to 54321” is an example of an opt-in instruction. “Message and data rates may apply” is the standard-rate service’s pricing information. All of these things should be clear on your CTA and should not require scrolling or page-turning away from other portions of the CTA to read.*

/* Note: Never use the word “FREE” for a standard campaign. Subscribers are still paying for message and data rates via their carrier.

Example Call to Action

The following is an example of a live CTA:

Text SMS to 77039 for recurring mobile marketing tips from Aerialink Messenger. Msg&DataRatesMayApply.
Privacy Policy: https://www.aerialink.com/legal/privacy-policy/
Mobile Terms & Conditions: https://www.aerialink.com/legal/short-code/77039-sc/

Please keep in mind that on a web page, the T&Cs and Privacy Policy may take the form of linked text, but in print CTAs the full URL must be explicitly shown as demonstrated above.

Short Code T&Cs

Mobile program Terms & Conditions must be published and/or web-accessible and must contain the components outlined below. While multiple mobile Terms & Conditions can share the same page, each must individually meet these requirements in order for that code/program to maintain compliance. These mobile Terms may be hosted on their own mobile Terms page, or included within a distinct section of company Terms & Conditions. Review the checklist below to ensure that your mobile Terms & Conditions page meets all criteria.

For a live example of a completed Terms & Conditions page, visit our Aerialink Messenger Terms & Conditions

ComponentAdditional Requirements
STOP InstructionsClear and conspicuous with “STOP” in bold.
HELP InstructionsClear and conspicuous with “HELP” in bold.
Call to ActionMost Terms & Conditions pages require only simple opt-in instructions (e.g., “send KEYWORD to #####”). However, if the end-user will receive a phone call as a result of opting in, a full Call to Action is required on the Terms & Conditions Page.
Program/Sponsor InformationProgram name, company name and/or brand associated with the campaign
Program/Service DescriptionWhat the program is and what services it provides.
Message&Data Rates Disclosure“Msg&DataRatesMayApply,” worded thusly or spelled out, in bold.*
Frequency/Recurrence StatementIf your program will send out messages continually to the end-user post-opt-in without further end-user prompting, it must be described as “recurring.” This word should be bolded for easy location.
FCC TCPA DisclaimerThe following disclaimer is required for all marketing message campaigns:

“By opting into [Program Name], the end-user agrees to receive pre-written marketing messages from or on behalf of [Sponsor] via short code [SC#], and understands that consent is not a condition of purchase.”**
Emergency Alert DisclaimerIf your service is providing emergency alerts, you should include the following disclaimer in your Terms & Conditions:

Alerts sent via SMS may not be delivered to you if your phone is not in range of a transmission site, or if sufficient network capacity is not available at a particular time. Even within a coverage area, factors beyond the control of your wireless carrier may interfere with message delivery, including the customer’s equipment, terrain, and proximity to buildings, foliage, and weather. You acknowledge that urgent alerts may not be timely received and that your wireless carrier does not guarantee that alerts will be delivered.
Customer Service InformationA toll-free number, email address or web submission form
Privacy Policy LinkThe privacy policy linked from your mobile terms & conditions can be a general privacy policy for your company. It does not have to be specific to your mobile program.
Material T&CsIf multiple services are involved, they may share a page but must be distinct and clear from one another, and each program’s section must meet all of the requirements on this page.
Compatible CarriersA list of carriers who support your service.
Carrier Liability Disclaimer“Carriers are not liable for delayed or undelivered messages.”
ConfirmationIf a checkbox is used by an end-user to accept the mobile terms and conditions, it cannot be pre-checked.

* The phrase “standard rates may apply” is no longer accepted.
** Campaigns which are non-marketing in nature such as two-factor authentication, banking alerts, et cetera are not required to include the above disclaimer.

Short Code Use Case Approval

Carriers will approve the use case for a mobile program as long as they have a clear understanding of what your service offers. Follow the guidelines below when determining your use-case.

Standard-Rate Campaign vs. FTEU

Aerialink supports Standard-Rate messaging, which is the term used to describe programs which are not Free-to-End-User. Message and data rates may apply to mobile subscribers of standard-rate campaigns and the use of the term “free” to describe standard-rate campaigns is prohibited. Some carriers may require additional fees from FTEU campaigns to accommodate their “free” status to end-users.

Note: “Premium” message programs - which charged end-users directly either per-message or with a recurring subscription fee - are no longer supported by the mobile services industry.

Useful, Informative or Entertaining Service

Your campaign must provide a service to the end-user. This service can be useful, informative, entertaining or any combination therein. A service which prompts a user to text in “hi” to receive a response of “hi” from your system is not a sound use case on its own and may be declined by the carriers.

No Adult Content

Adult-oriented violent or sexual content is prohibited.

Requested Interaction

The information you send to your end-user must have been solicited by them. Your use case must therefore include a call-to-action whose purpose is to grab user attention and invite them not only to try the service, but instruct them on how to do so. See the Call to Action article for more information about the CTA.

Short Code Sweepstakes Programs

If your short code program is a Sweepstakes, bear in mind that you must provide answers to the following:

  1. How is the program classified as a “sweepstakes”?
  2. Can/will end-users opt into the sweepstakes via a short code or program to which they have already subscribed?
  3. Can/will end-users initiate the opt-in via a separate CTA, keyword, or other opt-in mechanism?
  4. What is your CTA? Where will it be displayed?
  5. Where are your official rules located?

Short Code MMS Certification

Short codes must be certified for MMS independently from their SMS certification, even if the same short code will be used for both services and has already been certified for SMS.

It is Aerialink’s policy to submit new certifications for SMS and MMS concurrently, as when submitted simultaneously the MMS certification comes at no additional charge, while submitting MMS later on will incur a full amendment fee. For more information about the cost of MMS certification, speak with your Aerialink Account Manager.

In order to certify for MMS via short code we must exemplify the MMS use-case - in other words, how will MMS be used to engage with the end-user on this code? As such, we will need some things from you:

  1. A summary of how you intend to use MMS on the code.
  2. An example inbound message (including image).
  3. One or more example outbound messages (including images).

Canadian Short Code Certification

When considering mobile program compliance for Canada, please don’t forget to check against Canada’s Anti-Spam Legislation (CASL).

Certification Documentation

CSC Application Form

In place of the program brief used in the United States, this CSC Application Form is slightly more detailed in its requirements. Below is listed some key information you will want to have on hand when completing this form in addition to the message content, CTAs and links to T&Cs.

  1. Party Roles - The CWTA will want to know any and all company entities involved with the short code program that is undergoing certification.
  2. “Call” Flow - You must provide not only the message responses for system keywords, but all active keywords and their associated responses involved in the flow and conduct of the mobile program.
  3. Explicit Message Frequency - While U.S. carrier standards have shifted to a simple “recurring” or non-recurring approach with regard to message frequency, the CWTA still requires that programs whose messages are recurring detail the frequency of that recurrence explicitly (e.g. “2msgs/mo,” “1msg/wk,” etc).
  4. Marketing & Traffic Projections - Even if you’re estimating, the CWTA will want to see them.

CWTA Ready for Testing Document

This form is essentially a repeat of details you will provide in your CSC Application Form, but is a concise focus on keywords, their responses and customer support information such as web pages, numbers and email addresses. Aerialink typically completes this document on behalf of our customers using the information you provide in the aforementioned CSC Application Form, but you are welcome to request and view this document at any time.

Canadian Short Code CTA

Your Canadian CTA should include a bare minimum of:

  • Opt-in Instructions
  • Msg&Data Disclaimer
  • Explicit message frequency if recurring

Aerialink Compliance articles are for informational use only. They do not constitute, and should not be taken as or in place of, legal advice. Aerialink customers are responsible for meeting all legal requirements applicable to their programs and are strongly encouraged to consult formal legal counsel.